There’s No Room for Error in Mother/Infant Matching

There are lots of problems that new parents worry about, but one big nightmare is the thought of an infant mix-up in the hospital that ends with someone else bringing home their bundle of joy.

More than 3.8 million births take place in the U.S., and a study shows that one out of every 10,000 babies will be misidentified in one or more hospital interaction. In addition to raising the wrong child for a lifetime, other repercussions can include a mother breastfeeding the wrong baby or surgical procedures being performed on the wrong baby.

This is a serious problem, which is why Zebra Technologies has come up with a way to seamlessly match mothers with infants. Their Mother/Infant/Birthing Partner wristbands use matching security code features and work with major HCIS platforms.

In addition to the most obvious benefit of reducing this horrifying type of error, it can also provide productivity, patient care and cost benefits. For example, it can make expensive pre-printed numbered armbands for security a thing of the past. It can also reduce the number of armbands that patients need to wear. There is no need for nurses to spend time writing names on armbands, and it gives mothers greater peace of mind that their babies won’t be involved in any type of unfortunate mix-up.

Zebra Gets it Right

Zebra has 15 years of experience providing patient ID solutions to hospitals around the country and the world. Their infant security solution uses the Zebra HC100 wristband printer, which boasts a cartridge system that is easy to load and occupies a small footprint. It uses medical-grade plastic, and its power supply has achieved the healthcare-grade IEC 60601-1 certification for maximum staff and patient safety. Wristband formats are available for download free of charge from a designated site.

This innovative system can help ensure that this magical time in a family’s life is remembered for all of the right reasons.

Download Zebra’s Fact Sheet.





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